I’m Not a Victim of a Psychopath

This is a great attitude to have after having encountered a predatory psychopath, as it is a healthy headspace to be in as you move forward. You have been betrayed, abused, conned, and have certainly lost any combination of precious resources, time, attention, energy, financial, mental, physical, and spiritual health, and wellness. And for what?

For the benefit of a predatory psychopath who seeks to devour the resources of others with no the slightest regard for who they are sucking the life out of, and they will do anything, I mean ANY THING, to do it.

They don’t care if your rotting carcass is left in a ditch somewhere. In fact, they might like that very much, if it couldn’t be linked back to themselves, especially if it looked like suicide. And so many of them are very skilled at making their victims contemplate suicidal thoughts.

These predatory psychopaths only have one program that they run ad infinitum:

Get Everything You Want from Anyone You Can

If you have things he or she has no interest to him or her, you may be able to keep those resources, but be forewarned that even these things, if they can be used against you, may be lost in your predatory psychopathic encounter. And if the psychopath can use these otherwise unwanted or “safe” resources to convert them into something that they do want by another con or series of con games, then you will lose those resources as well.

I have seen the full scale of predatory psychopath victims, from those who have lost a little and were instantly aware of being the “mark” of a predatory psychopath’s scheme, and they were able to stop the process early on. I have also seen people lose everything. I mean EVERY THING, and left to die, with nothing.

It would be a predatory psychopath’s preference to drain you of all your resources, destroy any integrity or relationships that you might have had in your family and the community, and leave you with no way to survive and nothing to live for.

Being a “victim” of such a villain is not a sign of weakness. Though you may resist the thought of referring to yourself as a victim, it is without a doubt, the intention of this “evil” character to fully victimize you. (I put evil in quotes because that’s how prosecutors refer to them if they are known by the system to be predatory psychopaths).

Once I became aware of my predatory psychopathic entanglement, I refused to be the “victim” and took steps to prevent him from further victimizing me. I was confident that I could create a safe and secure environment around me and keep him from doing any further damage.

I was proud of my success in doing so. I maintained a good attitude, kept on living life, maintained a high level of security around myself, and ignored anything he would try to say or do, with confidence that if he could receive no response or energy from me, he would surely just fade away.

While all psychopaths are different and this tactic might work for most of them, this one was infuriated by my ability to neutralize his efforts, and that was when he declared war on me. He spent millions of dollars to discredit and defame me, vowed to destroy me, leaving me in prison, or dead.

So, he launched his campaign. Even with his best efforts, I was resilient, consistent, and firm. Unshaken and actually began to see his efforts as entertainment, as he tried to attack me in any way he could. I saw myself as bulletproof.

That was, until he turned his attacks against my family, friends, and anyone I had any association with.

As these people came to me with their horror stories, I was unable to calm them with, “but he’s just using smoke and mirrors to intimidate and frighten you,” it offered them no relief. They did not know who he was, as I did, and they were deeply concerned, and I tried to explain, they were more offended that it was clear that this was all my fault. That I had unintentionally unleashed the beast on them.

It left me no choice but to put myself back on the front lines and take him on mano a mano.

I would never suggest that anyone attempt to take a predatory psychopath on in a full-frontal attack because, if yours is a masterful one, you, everything, and everyone you care about will suffer the consequences of the assertion of your bravery.

But I felt I had no choice.

As I re-engaged with my psychopath, he immediately stopped attacking everyone else in my circle of influence and refocused all of his efforts on me once again.

I was fortunate enough to complete the battle on top. Again, I would caution anyone to not attempt to take on a predatory psychopath.

I was blessed to be able to exit the battle with very few war wounds (some still remain) and he was forced to fake his death (which he did masterfully) and change his identity (once again).

But the good news is, while he supposed to be dead (just the idea of it gives thousands of victims a sense of peace), he can no longer directly attack me or my people without revealing that he is not dead.

So, all things work out for good.

But I would be wary about ever thinking that I, or anyone else, should take a psychopathic predator on, to teach him or her a lesson.

This has been the knee-jerk reaction of many a victim who has regretted it in the end.

The general rule of thumb is:

Do Not Engage in Combat with a Psychopath

 

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